AKAQ’s First Anthology: Let’s discuss

First of all, this year is going to be a busy one. In this month alone I’m going through lots of personal changes and they are all very significant, life changing type changes. Writing-wise I have huge plans, both for my own endeavors and for this blog here. The most important is an anthology.

Right now? I would love to just hear input from any writer, any reader, or just anyone who frequents this blog.

When and if I get this going these conditions wont change:

1) Genre: Speculative fiction, crime, noir, horror and sci fi. Pretty much any pulp type material.

2) Cheap and nonprofitable: Depending on the amount of authors I’d like to keep the ebook under $3 and over 99 cents. All profit will go towards the AKAQ website, which includes upgrades, access to more images (Which this website lacks, except for book covers. We have tons of those thanks to Amazon.) and other website related costs.

3) Availability in Amazon. Others are up for debate.

Now, these are topics I would like to discuss:

1) Submission length. Maybe flash/poems in-between stories.

2) Help. I would like either someone who wants to help editing or perhaps some beta readers. I personally like using the writers to go through the whole book, but surprisingly I feel like I’m the only one that ever does it and I feel like I’m bothering the editor, even though I want the whole book, which has my story in it, to be as polished as possible.

3) Covers: I have some ideas already maybe using the image we currently have on our frontpage.

4) A physical book: I once sold pre-orders to my first book and found how successful it was. But after that found almost no sales through lulu.com After that I moved over to Amazon and found a way better and pleasant market. I would like to sale pre-orders through lulu.com again. It’s cheap, I can drop the price to $5 bucks and still make the donation worth it. After all the primary point is to get writer’s work out there and the website’s funds are, if anything, not important at all.

5) Do you want in? I want to include at least 20 authors, and I think I can easily get pieces from the usual bunch around here. I think I plan to send some invites first and then open it up to submissions. This way I could get some bigger names mixed with some new talent.

So discuss, I love a good online discussion. 🙂

-L. Vera

“Writers forget that the short story is a gift” -Writer’s Interviews – Craig Wallwork by Jason Michel

A brand new issue of PULP METAL MAGAZINE, chock full of mayhem like this: check it out!

PULP METAL MAGAZINE

Craig Wallwork is relevant and irreverent.

His writing is a smorgasbord of cinematic imagery and a gleeful “Fuck You!” to the conventions and pomposity of literature.

I like him and this interview, like the collapse of the financial system, was only a matter of time coming …

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Review: One Buck Horror – A Surprisingly Happy Swim

by L. Vera

I was very skeptical at first. It’s five short stories for 99 cents. I held my breathe and dove in. I found myself swimming in a very organized book, I can’t believe the amount of kindle books, with bad table of contents and misspellings. The editing is great, professional grade. The book is written for the general public, so I never needed to look any word up. (I always like to at least learn one new word a story.)

The first lap I did was with Ada Hoffman’s “Jenny’s House”. It’s written a bit broken, which is not a flaw, it’s to emphasize the innocents of the main character, a young boy. He recalls finding slime, which he brings to class for show and tell. If the kids weren’t amazed by “show” portion the “tell” part is beyond belief. The story is simple and clean. Nothing frightening but it also influenced me to write a similar piece. By far the best piece in the book.

The next story is “A Lullaby for Caliban” which felt like a story out of the old Goosebump books I used to read a lot as a child. “The Cornfield” was another one that I would group with more of a children’s tale. They were both delightful, but lacked any real fear.

“The Last Nephew” had me swallow some water. We find a little boy who was kidnapped and serving his “Uncle” as a little helper. As soon as his “Uncle” finds out that the boy what’s to know help in more ways, it’s too late. It’s a taboo subject that gave the collection that adult twist the others didn’t have. It’s tasteful and read very well.

The last story was a nice ending. “The Ginger Men” had me full interested. I reached the surface for more air and when I came down found a story about a vengeful mother using magically cookie dough to punish her husband. Did he deserve it? I don’t think so, no one deserves that.

Overall, this is a great buy and I will definitely pick up the others in the future. Don’t expect over the tops scares or even a small bucket full of gore. I personally think the stories are meant for a younger crowd, with the exception of “The Last Nephew” but every single story was told from a child’s perspective. This really seems like speculative fiction than horror, but is still worth the read. So I say you should swim in this pool, no pee; mostly just loving monsters and carnival freaks.

Find it on Amazon.

Get Your Story Made Into A Film: BDHR Looking For Submissions

Publisher: BDHR Entertainment

Theme: Horror

Pay:

  • You will get an on screen “story” credit, as well as a credit on IMDB
  • $100

 

Notes: I already turned in something, a little Idea I had written down quickly the other day. Make sure you read the post throughly and I wish you luck.

-L. Vera

Review: Harry Charter’s Chronicles (An Uppercutting Detective Story)

Reviewer: L. Vera

Author: Graham Smith

Book: Harry Charters’ Chronicles

A very interesting read. The writing is quick, full of fights and detective work. It’s basically a whole bunch of short stories thrown together to form a novella. When you read it, it’s like reading a very busy detective’s life. Almost like watching a whole season in one sitting. I actually enjoyed being pulled into this world. I would read a lot of book  structured this way. It’s new and I just so happened to like it.

I had some problems with the Harry Charter. The character is invincible, and extremely lucky. I did think he was almost like Popeye but instead of spinach, his fuel was alcohol. Okay, he had vices, the most obvious one was his alcohol addiction, but beyond that he beats up everybody like he’s Chuck Norris. I actually wanted to see his ass handed to him near the end; but instead we find him uppercutting and maneuvering like ninja. A guy like this shouldn’t be a detective, he should be the one who takes The Ring into Mordor. (Yeah, I fit a LOTR reference in ’cause I’m awesome.) This guy should have higher rates then what he charged since he never failed a case.

This book would be perfect if it had these three fixes:

  • Better transition between stories. (It’s like whatever happened Monday, didn’t really effect anyone or anything; and by the end of the book only the last case mattered)
  • The case that made him the sonafabitch that he was.
  • Got beat up. (At least once. I’d like to see how he deals with something not going as planned.)

Overall, it’s a good read. The structure itself reads great. It’s fresh and even though I was wondering where the next story ended and one began, accepting the fact that like life, there is no beginning and end, it works. It could use a little refining and a table of contents, but overall a fresh book and a decent price.

-L. Vera